Cardiology

Gastrointestinal bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention: Not just a short-term complication but a long-term marker of mortality risk.


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Gastrointestinal bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention: Not just a short-term complication but a long-term marker of mortality risk.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2020 04 01;95(5):E146-E147

Authors: Gilchrist IC

Abstract
The incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after percutaneous coronary interventional has remained stable recently although those undergoing treatment for ST-elevation myocardial infarction appear to be doing better. Short-term prognosis is worsened after a GI bleed and this adverse outcome persists out to at least 1 year. Poor outcomes late after a GI bleed suggest persistence patient factors that require further study to understand who is at risk, whether short-term measures can prevent bleeding, and whether interventions after bleeding can improve long-term outcomes.

PMID: 31957914 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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