Pharma / Biotech

[The clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: update 2015-2017].

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[The clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection: update 2015-2017].

Rev Chilena Infectol. 2019 Aug;36(4):475-489

Authors: Osorio T L, Rivera C M, Pino-Marín DE, Giraldo NA, Amariles P

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetics of anti-retrovirals (ARVs) can be modified by other concomitant medicinal products. It is timely to update the interactions between new ARVs and drugs of chronic use to maintain therapeutic success.
AIM: To update information about drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy.
METHODS: Comprehensive literature review in MEDLINE/PubMed database from January of 2015 to June of 2017, using the Mesh terms: Anti-retroviral agents and drug interactions or herb-drug interactions or food-drug interactions. Publications with drug interactions in humans, in English or Spanish, and with full text were retrieved. Additionally, citation lists from identified articles were reviewed. The study inclusion was assessed by three independent researchers and by consensus among them when was necessary. Clinical relevance of drug interaction was grouped into levels according to seriously and probability of occurrence.
RESULTS: 466 articles were identified; full text was accessed in 444. Of these, 164 provided interactions, which allowed the identification of a total of 534 pairs of drug interactions. The interactions that presented a higher risk of generating safety and effectiveness problems were 308 (57.7%) of level 2 and 35 (6.6%) of level 1.
CONCLUSIONS: We identify 534 new pairs of drug interactions, of which 308 (64.2%) are the most clinically relevant.

PMID: 31859772 [PubMed – in process]

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