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[The effect of spinal card stimulation on quality of life in patients with critical lower limb ischemia].

Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2019;83(3):57-63

Authors: Klinkova AS, Kamenskaya OV, Ashurkov AV, Lomivorotov VN

Abstract
Today, there are insufficient data on the dynamics of quality of life (QoL) in patients with critical lower limb ischemia after spinal cord stimulation.
OBJECTIVE: To study the dynamics of QoL in patients with critical lower limb ischemia one year after spinal cord stimulation.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: QoL analysis was performed in 43 patients with critical lower limb ischemia using the SF-36 questionnaire before and one year after spinal cord stimulation.
RESULTS: At baseline, we detected reduced QoL parameters corresponding to the physical function (≤30 points). The parameters of mental health corresponded to the moderate level (the score ranged between 42 and 59 points). The total score of physical well-being was reduced: 22.8 (20.2-29.3); the mean score of mental well-being was 41 (32.8-49.2) (p<0.001). One year after spinal cord stimulation, the level of all QoL parameters was increased but the total score of physical well-being remained low 33.2 (24-44.1). The mean score of mental well-being corresponded to the moderate level of QoL 56.5 (49-60.4) (p<0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed that the physical parameters of QoL after spinal cord stimulation are adversely affected by such factors as age, the history of stroke, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in combination with stenosis of brachiocephalic arteries (BCA). The mental health is affected by age and the presence of stenosis of brachiocephalic arteries.
CONCLUSION: When selecting patients with critical lower limb ischemia for spinal cord stimulation, such factors as the baseline clinical status (comorbidities), age, history of stroke, and the severity of peripheral artery ischemia need to be taken into account to improve treatment effectiveness and QoL.

PMID: 31339497 [PubMed – in process]

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