Neurology

Self-reported inner speech relates to phonological retrieval ability in people with aphasia.

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Self-reported inner speech relates to phonological retrieval ability in people with aphasia.

Conscious Cogn. 2019 Mar 25;71:18-29

Authors: Fama ME, Henderson MP, Snider SF, Hayward W, Friedman RB, Turkeltaub PE

Abstract
Many individuals with aphasia report the ability to say words in their heads despite spoken naming difficulty. Here, we examined individual differences in the experience of inner speech (IS) in participants with aphasia to test the hypotheses that self-reported IS reflects intact phonological retrieval and that articulatory output processing is not essential to IS. Participants (N = 53) reported their ability to name items correctly internally during a silent picture-naming task. We compared this measure of self-reported IS to spoken picture naming and a battery of tasks measuring the underlying processes required for naming (i.e., phonological retrieval and output processing). Results from three separate analyses of these measures indicate that self-reported IS relates to phonological retrieval and that speech output processes are not a necessary component of IS. We suggest that self-reported IS may be a clinically valuable measure that could assist in clinical decision-making regarding anomia diagnosis and treatment.

PMID: 30921682 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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