Dentistry

Diabetes poses a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis B: a population-based cohort study.



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Diabetes poses a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis B: a population-based cohort study.

J Viral Hepat. 2019 Feb 09;:

Authors: Shyu YC, Huang TS, Chien CH, Yeh CT, Lin CL, Chien RN

Abstract
Diabetes mellitus may be a risk factor of HCC development in chronic hepatitis B infected patients and affect the all-cause mortality. This study aimed to examine whether DM was associated with the development of HCC with CHB and affected the all-cause mortality. A total of 2,966 CHB patients newly diagnosed with DM in 2000 were retrieved from the Longitudinal Cohort of Diabetes Patients database and used propensity scores matching based on age, sex-gender, alcohol-related liver disease, and baseline liver cirrhosis to compare with the non-DM patients from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. The CHB patients with DM compared to the non-DM had significantly increased (3.3%) risk for HCC development and significantly increased (2.8%) risk of HCC-related mortality. Interestingly, the all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the DM cohort (16.9%) compared to the non-DM cohort (8.2%). In a multivariable transition-specific Cox model to investigate the adjusted hazard ratio of CHB patients with DM or non-DM during the transitions from start to HCC was 1.35; 95%CI (1.16- 1.57) and from HCC to death was 1.31; 95%CI (1.06-1.62). All-cause mortality between CHB patients with DM or non-DM during the transitions from start to death was 2.32; 95%CI (1.84-2.92). Taken together, DM is an independent risk factor associated with increasing disease development of HCC, HCC-related mortality, and all-cause mortality in CHB patients. This study may provide a clinical strategy for strict DM control in order to reduce the risk of disease development in CHB patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 30739359 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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