OBJECTIVES:

We compared demographics and work, financial, and satisfaction experiences of early-career and midcareer pediatricians categorized by their childhood and medical school locations.

METHODS:

Data from the Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study were used to examine the characteristics and experiences of 3 groups, which were categorized as (1) international childhood and medical school graduate (international-IMG), (2) United States childhood and international medical school graduate (US-IMG), and (3) United States or international childhood and United States medical school graduate (USMG). With multivariable logistic regression, we examined the experiences of the groups, controlling for participant characteristics.

RESULTS:

Data from 1467 of 1804 participants were analyzed; 13% were categorized as international-IMGs, 6% were categorized as US-IMGs, and 81% were categorized as USMGs. International-IMGs and US-IMGs were less likely than USMGs to report their race and ethnicity as white and non-Hispanic (26%, 32%, and 71%, respectively; P < .05) and more likely to report caring for patients with public insurance (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27–2.56] and aOR 2.12 [95% CI 1.31–3.42], respectively). International-IMGs were less likely than USMGs to agree that physician colleagues value their work (aOR 0.35; 95% CI 0.21–0.56). Overall, 8 in 10 reported that their work was personally rewarding; international-IMGs were less likely than USMGs to report such satisfaction (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among a national sample of pediatricians, international-IMGs and US-IMGs play important roles in workforce diversity. They also report unique challenges. Most are satisfied with their work, but international-IMGs are the least satisfied.

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