Pediatrics

Mothers whose responses to infants' facial cues increase report stronger bonds with babies




A new study examines whether pregnancy changes mothers’ neural sensitivity to infants’ facial cues, and whether such changes affect mother-infant bonding. The study finds that increases in cortical responses to infants’ faces from the prenatal to the postnatal period in individual mothers are associated with more positive relationships with the baby (as reported by the mothers) after birth.

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