There is a growing need for new antibiotics to help combat the looming threat of antimicrobial resistance. According to a new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) with colleagues at the University of Oslo, and other organizations, between 1999 and 2014, only 25 new antibiotics representing nine different antibiotic classes entered the global market. The majority of antibiotics released in this time period originated from Japanese (11 of 25) or US (6 of 25) companies and were launched in Japan (7) or the US (12). Of the 25 antibiotics, 18 were intended to treat community-acquired respiratory tract infections, 14 for skin and skin structure infections, and 12 for urinary tract infections. Furthermore, 52% of new antibiotics were indicated to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria while none targeted Gram-negative bacteria, which are the cause of most untreatable infections.

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